Survivors are not responsible for their victimization; perpetrators are accountable for their actions and the outcomes. The following safety information may help reduce the possibility of becoming a victim.

Ensuring a safe environment for everyone on our campus.

Although Garden City remains one of the safest neighborhoods on Long Island and Adelphi University one of the safest campuses in the country, we remain as determined as ever to be vigilant about concerns of safety. Please take a moment to review the following safety tips and the linked guides found on this page.

Working together as a community, we will continue to ensure a safe environment for everyone at Adelphi University.

If you witness a crime or experience an emergency on campus, dial 5 from any campus phone 24 hours a day to reach the Adelphi Public Safety Department.

General Safety Tips

Safety is an important concern in any large town. Follow these safety tips and use common sense. You will find that it really is possible to fully enjoy living, studying and working on Long Island.

  • Familiarize yourself with streets and neighborhoods you’ll be visiting or passing through.
  • Walk in an assertive manner.
  • At night, walk facing the flow of traffic.
  • Know where you are going. Plan your route in advance.
  • Walk in well-lighted and populated areas, especially at night. Stay out of parts at night. Be aware of your surroundings and of suspicious persons or circumstances.
  • Travel with a friend if possible.
  • Avoid wearing expensive jewelry and flashing money on the street and in the subways.
  • Always keep bags closed and knapsacks zipped and buckled. Keep your purse on your lap at restaurants. Don’t hang it on the back of your chair or leave it in an empty chair.
  • If you suspect you are being followed, cross the street or go into a store, restaurant or other public building.
  • Know the whereabouts of all-night delicatessens and other safe locations.
  • If someone in a car asks you a question, stay a good distance from the car when responding.
  • Always carry enough money for cab fare home and quarters or phone cards to make phone calls.
  • Try not to use cash machines at night.

Never leave personal belongings unattended, whether you are in a lab, office, the library, etc. Unwatched articles invite thieves, regardless of how long you will be gone (even a couple of minutes).

Lock your door each time you leave your room, office or lab. Most thefts in the university environment occur in unlocked areas. Do not prop self-locking doors but do report defective locks to the locksmith immediately through the Footprints Work Order System or by contacting the locksmith at ext. 3512 or Public Safety at 3500. Do not leave notes on your desk or door advertising your absence or when you will return.

Athletics facilities are not immune to thieves. Try not to bring valuables (expensive watches, jewelry, wallets with cash and credit cards, etc.) with you when you exercise. If you must do so, be sure to lock everything in your locker. Report any suspicious person or activity to Public Safety (dial 5 on-campus phones or call 516.877.3511).

Most crimes can be prevented. While Public Safety tries to prevent crimes on campus, it is your responsibility to protect yourself. Help prevent crimes by locking your personal property (laptops, wallets, handbags, etc.) and valuables.

View the Property Theft Brochure

To Report a Crime or Suspicious Activity on Campus. Dial 5 from any campus phone 24 hours a day to reach the Adelphi Department of Public Safety.

Automated teller machines (ATMs) are a convenient and easy way to get cash. Each time you use an ATM, keep the following safety tips in mind:

  • Common sense is your best guide when using ATMs. Trust your instincts and only use ATMs where you feel safe and comfortable.
  • If you need to visit an ATM after dark, bring a friend whenever possible and always choose ATMs that are well lit. In most cases, clearly visible signs indicate that a camera is in use.
  • Have your ATM card ready before going to an ATM to avoid exposing your wallet or purse. Fill out your deposit slip and place your cash or checks in a sealed deposit envelope before arriving at an ATM location. After a withdrawal, be sure to put your money, receipt, card and wallet away before leaving the ATM.
  • Your ATM card cannot be used without your personal identification number (PIN), so keep your number secret. Memorize your PIN and never write it on your card or leave it in your wallet. When you use an ATM, stand between the machine and the person behind you so no one can see you enter your number. If you suspect someone is looking over your shoulder, cancel the transaction and leave immediately.
  • Whether you use an ATM in an enclosed vestibule, on the street or at a drive-up window, always be aware of your surroundings. When you are in a vestibule, close the entry door completely upon entering and exiting, and do not offer entry to strangers. At the drive-up, keep your engine running, lock all your doors, and open only the driver’s window.

If your card is lost or stolen, report it to the bank immediately and contact your local Police and Department of Public Safety by dialing ext. 3511 on-campus if the card has been stolen or has been fraudulently used.

Below are the contacts for the most common companies to report a lost or stolen credit card.

Credit Card Company Phone or Website Info
American Express 800.528.4800

Report Lost/Stolen Card to American Express Online

Discover 800.347.2683

Report Lost/Stolen Card to Discover Online

Mastercard 800.627.8372
Visa 800.847.2911
Equifax Report Fraud Alert to Equifax

Contact the national credit reporting organizations immediately to place a fraud alert on your name and Social Security number

Social Security Fraud Line 800.269.0271

Crime survivors are not responsible for their victimization; perpetrators are accountable for their crimes and the outcomes of their actions. The following safety information may help reduce the possibility of becoming a victim of a crime.

  • Program your phone. Save the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety’s phone number to your phone to have the number readily available in the event of an emergency. You can contact the command center, which is operated 24/7 at 516.877.3507 and 516.877.3511. You can also dial “5” from any campus phone.
  • Always trust your instincts. If you are uncomfortable in a situation, or you suspect something is wrong, you are probably right. Leave the situation. Don’t worry about what others think; safety comes first.
  • Be alert and aware of your surroundings. If you detect any suspicious activity and are concerned about your safety, immediately respond to a location where you can call for assistance (i.e., emergency phones, emergency call boxes).  
  • Red call boxes: Be aware of the red call box telephones in parking lots and walkways throughout campus. Use these telephones to be immediately connected with the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety Command Center.
  • Use your cell phone. Make sure it’s charged before you leave home and coordinate with a friend if you need to text him or her for a “friend-assist.” Also, make a plan in case your phone dies, so you can meet up with your friends at a familiar location at a certain time.
  • Keep your doors locked at all times. Do not prop self-locking doors and do report defective locks to the locksmith immediately through the Footprints Work Order System or by contacting the locksmith at ext. 3512 or Public Safety at ext. 3500.
  • Do not allow any individual into your room, office or lab if you do not know who they are, if they are not authorized or if they are not supervised.
  • Stick with your friends. Arrive at events together, check in with one another throughout, and leave together. Think twice about going off alone and if, for whatever reason, you have to separate from your friends, let them know where you are going and who you are with.
  • Do not enter or remain with a stranger in an elevator if you feel unsafe.
  • Do not enter or approach a stranger’s vehicle.
  • Do not resist a robbery attempt. Remain calm, cool and observant. Take no action that would jeopardize your safety or the safety of others.
  • If you walk into your building and find suspicious individuals loitering there, do not enter. Instead, leave and find a safe location where you can call Public Safety.
  • If you see something, say something! Don’t be afraid to call school security.

A wide variety of con artists operate on the streets. Adelphi students are not exempt from their wiles. Take heed of these warnings.

  • Beware of strangers offering to include you in any quick money-making deals and also beware of chain letters and pyramid schemes
  • In most con games, there are usually at least two participants. One person adds credibility to the other one’s story.
  • Con artists often want you to put up some money to show good faith.
  • Con artists will frequently pretend ignorance of the local environment and get sympathy to help accomplish some type of financial transaction.
  • In one common game, con artists put up their own money to show their cooperation. Your money and their money are put together in a handkerchief. They often give you the money to hold, but, in demonstrating how to keep it secure, they place it in their pocket where the handkerchief is switched: You get the one with worthless contents. They may give you directions to some office or bank and will be gone when you return.
  • If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

You probably think that you would never be fooled by such ploys. But these people are convincing. They may represent themselves as strangers, lawyers, bankers or law enforcement officers. At home, they may say they are repairers, meter inspectors or salesmen with bargains. Demand credentials and question people thoroughly.

There are no circumstances under which any legitimate authority will ask you to withdraw any money from a bank or surrender your valuables.

If you become a victim, report the crime immediately to Adelphi Public Safety and to the police.

How bias-related crimes can touch a college campus;

  • A swastika spray-painted on the University’s Interfaith Center door
  • A student physically assaulted by a group yelling racial slurs
  • Harassing letters containing homophobic epithets mailed to lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender students

These are just a few examples of how bias-related crimes can touch a college campus. Also considered  hate crimes, bias-related crimes are criminal acts such as aggravated harassment, arson, assault, criminal mischief or murder committed by an individual(s) motivated by a bias against the victim’s age, ancestry, color, disability, gender, national origin, race, religion, religious practice, sexual orientation or gender expression, regardless of whether the belief or perception is correct.These crimes are unique in that they affect not only the victim(s), but also the group to which the victim belongs, and, as such, threaten to tear at the fabric that holds the community together. 

What to do if a bias-related incident and/or hate crime takes place: 

  • Your safety is of utmost priority. If you are in danger, go to a safe place immediately and contact the proper authorities by dialing 911. In addition, the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety has arranged for merchants in the immediate Garden City area to post stickers in their windows that identify them as safe havens or places for students to go for assistance in the event of an emergency. 
  • Seek medical treatment at once for any injuries you might have sustained.
  • Try to document the incident as best as possible. Take photographs of your injuries and the scene and record the names and contact information of any possible witnesses. Save any threatening voicemail messages, text messages or any other electronic or written communications or postings.
  • Because bias-related incidents often strike at the heart of personal identity, reporting them can be a sensitive and embarrassing issue. However, you should seriously consider reporting any bias incidents to the Adelphi University Public Safety department at 516.877.3511 and the police. Reporting highlights the importance of increased security, raises awareness of bias throughout the University and community and may enable prosecution of the perpetrator.
  • Bias-related incidents may be violations of University policy, and victims of these offenses should consider bringing University disciplinary proceedings.
  • In the aftermath of a bias-related incident, victims often feel shock, anger, fear, powerlessness and depression. Contact the Adelphi University Student Counseling Center or other off-campus organizations for support that can help you cope. 
  • If you are the victim of a bias-related crime, and you have reported that crime to the police, you may be eligible for compensation through the New York State Crime Victims Board. Call 800.247.8035 or TTY: 888.289.9747 or visit ovs.ny.gov for eligibility requirements.

Additional Resources:

Bias Crimes: What the Adelphi Community Needs to Know

Remember the three L’s: Lights, Locks and  the Law.

Light up your residence, Lock your doors and windows at all times and call the Law when you see something suspicious.

Crime survivors are not responsible for their victimization; perpetrators are accountable for their crimes and the outcomes of their actions. The following safety information may help reduce the possibility of becoming a victim of a crime.

General Safety Tips

  • Program your phone. Save the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety’s phone number to your phone to have the number readily available in the event of an emergency. You can contact the command center, which is operated 24/7 at 516.877.3507 and 516.877.3511. You can also dial “5” from any campus phone.
  • Always trust your instincts. If you are uncomfortable in a situation, or you suspect something is wrong, you are probably right. Leave the situation. Don’t worry about what others think; safety comes first.
  • Be alert and aware of your surroundings. If you detect any suspicious activity and are concerned about your safety, immediately respond to a location where you can call for assistance (i.e., emergency phones, emergency call boxes).
  • Red call boxes: Be aware of the red call box telephones in parking lots and walkways throughout campus. Use these telephones to be immediately connected with the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety Command Center.
  • Never leave personal belongings unattended. Whether you are in a lab, office, the library, etc., unwatched articles invite thieves, regardless of how long you will be gone (even a couple of minutes).
  • Lock your door each time you leave your room, office or lab. Most thefts in the university environment occur in unlocked areas.
  • Keep your doors locked at all times. Do not prop self-locking doors and do report defective locks to the locksmith immediately through the Footprints Work Order System or by contacting the locksmith at ext. 3512 or Public Safety at ext. 3500.
  • Do not allow any individual into your room, office or lab if you do not know who they are, if they are not authorized or if they are not supervised.
  • Do not enter or remain with a stranger in an elevator if you feel unsafe.
  • If you see something, say something! Don’t be afraid to call school security.

Robbery Safety Tips

Robbery is the taking of, or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear. Follow these prevention and awareness safety tips.

    • Remain Calm and do not resist a robbery attempt. Remain calm, cool, and observant. Take no action that would jeopardize your safety or the safety of others.
    • Follow the robber’s directions, but do not offer more than what they ask for. Don’t argue. If you have to move or reach into your pockets to give the robber what they want, tell them what you are going to do and why.
    • Make mental notes of the robber’s appearance. You’ll need to describe the suspect when filing your report. Take note of their features including race, age, height, hair and eye color, clothing, etc. Is there anything unusual about their appearance such as scars or tattoos? If they have a weapon, make note of what it is so you can describe it later. If they come or go in a car, try to note the make and model and license plate number.
  • Notice what the robber does so you can include it in your report. If there are two accomplices, pay attention to any conversations they have with one another. Do they use each other’s names or nicknames? Do they mention any locations? Try to remember what they touch during the robbery so that police can check those areas for fingerprints.
  • After the robbery, go immediately to a safe location, then report the crime. Your personal safety is your top priority. Make sure you feel secure before you call 911 or the Department of Public Safety. If you’re in an isolated area, move to an area with people and ask someone to stay with you while you wait for help. If you opt to remain at the crime scene, try not to touch anything. If there are any witnesses, ask them to remain with you until Public Safety or the police arrive. If they must leave, write down their name, address and telephone number.

Burglary Safety Tips

  • Burglary is the unlawful entry into a structure, such as a residential hall room, to commit a felony or theft. Lock your door and close your windows. Locking up whenever you go out – and using deadbolts – can prevent a burglar from simply walking through your front door or climbing through a window.
  • Leave lights on when you go out. Make your home look occupied. 
  • Don’t let strangers into your halls of residence. Report the presence of strangers, whether they have gained access or are hanging around outside, to resident hall staff.
  • Buy a safe. It is worth investing in a quality safe, as chances are low that burglars are going to get into it.
  • If you open your door and suspect that someone you do not know is inside, DO NOT ENTER. Find a phone, call 911, and report a “burglary in progress”.
  • If you walk into your building and find suspicious individuals loitering there, do not enter. Instead, leave and find a safe location where you can call Public Safety.

Bystander intervention means safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking. Bystander intervention includes recognizing situations of potential harm, overcoming barriers to intervening, identifying safe and effective intervention options, and taking action to intervene.  Additional areas considered for bystander intervention include the witnessing of or having knowledge about hazing, discrimination, medical emergency and acts of discrimination.

Bystanders are less likely to intervene if more people are present, each assuming someone else may be more qualified to intercede. However, once one person steps up to help, the group will likely be more willing to assist.

Bystanders should notice the emergency, interpret it as such, assume personal responsibility for acting, choose a strategy and implement that strategy. A strategy could be as simple as saying something to the potential violator to stop the action, calling someone to help such as public safety, the police or other appropriate authority such as counselors, professors, or if safe to do so step in before the situation escalates.

Bystander training begins at Orientation for incoming freshman students, all transfer students and new employees,  and continues throughout the year for student organizations, sports teams, faculty training and administrative positions.

Multiple Actions and Helpful Hints for Being a Proactive Bystander

  • Believe that sexual and relationship violence is unacceptable and say it out loud
  • Treat people with respect
  • Speak up when you hear victim blaming/blaming statements
  • Talk with friends about confronting sexual and relationship violence
  • Encourage friends to trust their instincts in order to stay safe
  • Be a knowledgeable resource for survivors
  • Don’t laugh at sexist jokes or comments
  • Look out for friends at parties and bars
  • Educate yourself and your friends
  • Use campus resources
  • Attend awareness events
  • Empower survivors to tell their stories

Providing a Distraction Sometimes Is All It Takes to Interrupt a Potentially Dangerous Interaction

  • Call a friend’s cell repeatedly
  • Spill something on purpose
  • Tug on your friend’s arm insistently
  • Ask where the bathroom is
  • Interrupt the conversation
  • Turn off the music
  • Say, “I think that guy wants to talk to you” to separate those involved
  • Tell the potential perpetrator “Your car is being towed!”
  • Matter-of-factly pull your friend away saying, “We need to leave” – and then go

There are quite a few students and employees who commute to Adelphi by car. If you’re among them or if you bring a car to campus for any reason, here are a few tips:

  • Lock your car. When returning to your car, have your keys in hand so you’re not fumbling for them.
  • Leave nothing exposed in the car.
  • Place items in your trunk prior to leaving a parked car or take the items with you.
  • Check the front and back seats of your car before entering.
  • Drive with car doors locked and windows mostly closed.
  • Do not leave your purse or other valuables on the seat next to you while you are driving. Put valuable items in the trunk or behind your seat.
  • Invest in an ignition lock, club-type lock and car alarm system. Your car insurance will be reduced, and you are less likely to find that your car has been stolen.
  • Never park your car in a remote or dimly lit area.

The FBI New York office reminds the public to apply a critical eye before giving contributions to anyone soliciting donations on behalf of recent disaster victims. In the past, tragedies and natural disasters have inspired individuals with criminal intent to solicit contribution while falsely representing a charitable organization and/or good cause.

Therefore, before making a donation of any kind, consumers should adhere to certain guidelines, including the following:

  • Do not respond to any unsolicited (spam) incoming emails, including clicking links contained within those messages.
  • Be skeptical of individuals representing themselves as surviving victims or officials asking for donations via email or social networking sites.
  • Beware of organizations with copy-cat names similar to but not exactly the same as those of reputable charities.
  • Rather than following a purported link to a website, verify the legitimacy of nonprofit organizations by utilizing various Internet-based resources that may assist in confirming the group’s existence and its non-profit status.
  • Be cautious of emails that claim to show pictures of the disaster areas in attached files, because the files may contain viruses. Only open attachments from known senders.
  • To ensure contributions are received and used for intended purposes, make contributions directly to known organizations rather than relying on others to make the donation on your behalf.
  • Do not be pressured into making contributions, as reputable charities do not use such tactics.
  • Do not give your personal or financial information to anyone who solicits contributions. Providing such information may compromise your identity and make you vulnerable to identity theft.
  • Avoid cash donations if possible. Pay by debit or credit card, or write a check directly to the charity. Do not make checks payable to individuals

If you believe you have been a victim of fraud from a person or an organization soliciting relief funds on behalf of disaster or earthquake victims, contact the National Center for Disaster Fraud at 866.720.5721. You can also submit a NCDF Web Complaint Form.

The Adelphi University Department of Public Safety would like to remind the Adelphi community that extreme cold temperatures bring the danger of frostbite and hypothermia. Infants and the elderly are particularly at risk, but anyone can be affected. People seeking shelter from the cold can call 1.866.WARMBED (927.6233)

When working or playing outdoors during the winter, anyone can develop frostbite. There is no pain associated with the early stages of frostbite, so be alert for these frostbite danger signs: Skin may feel numb and become flushed. Then it turns white or grayish-yellow. Frostbitten skin feels cold to the touch. If you suspect frostbite, move to a warm area and cover the affected area with something warm and dry. Never rub frostbitten skin. Seek medical attention as quickly as possible.

Prolonged exposure to cold temperatures can cause hypothermia. Know the symptoms to watch for and how to respond to hypothermia: Symptoms of hypothermia include inability to concentrate, poor coordination, slurred speech, drowsiness, exhaustion, and uncontrollable shivering, followed by a sudden lack of shivering. If the person’s body temperature drops below 95 degrees Fahrenheit, get emergency medical assistance immediately! Remove wet clothing, wrap the victim in warm blankets and give warm, non-alcoholic, decaffeinated liquids until help arrives.

Cold temperatures put an extra strain on your heart. Heavy exertion, such as shoveling snow, clearing debris or pushing a car, can increase the risk of a heart attack. To avoid problems, remember these tips: Stay warm, dress warm and SLOW DOWN when working outdoors. Take frequent rests to avoid overexertion. If you feel chest pain—STOP and seek help immediately.


Winter Driving Preparedness

Building an emergency supply kit is an important component of winter driving preparedness. It is important to try to stay off the roads during dangerous winter weather events whenever possible. However, if you have to venture out, make sure you have already prepared an emergency supply kit as it can become a lifeline should the winter weather change for the worse.

Your Emergency Supply kit should start with the basic supplies such as water, non-perishable snacks, first aid kits, cell-phone charger, flashlight, blankets, and other items to keep you warm [boots, mittens, warm clothing, etc.]. Then you can expand by adding more items as seen in the picture to the right e.g., jumper cables, flares, full tank of gas, shovel/ice scraper, etc.]. 

It’s always best to be prepared, and have nothing happen, than for something to happen and be unprepared.

If you need medical assistance or to report an emergency Dial 911 off campus or Dial “5” from any campus phone to contact the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety.

Dating sites and apps have become increasingly popular over the last few years.  Unfortunately, the popularity of these sites brings new and challenging risks to light. Catfishing, trolling, internet stalking, identity theft, financial fraud and sexual assault are among those risks. According to police another popular scam on dating sites occurs when someone creates a fake profile to engage an unknowing victim in conversation. They then encourage the victim to disrobe and perform compromising acts, which they will videotape. They then research the victim on social media and threaten to send the videotape to family and friends unless a sum of money is paid.

Here are some simple ways to help keep you safe both online and off:

  • Program your phone. Save the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety’s phone number to your phone to have the number readily available in the event of an emergency. You can contact the command center, which is operated 24/7 at 516.877.3507 and 516.877.3511. You can also dial “5” from any campus phone.
  • Always trust your instincts. If you are uncomfortable in a situation or you suspect something is wrong, you are probably right. Leave the situation. Don’t worry about what others think; safety comes first.
  • Be aware of your surroundings. Whether you’re walking home from the library or a party, be mindful of potential risks. Get to know your campus or neighborhood and travel in well-lit walking or driving routes. Think of a safe-exit strategy. Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone nearby?
  • Red call boxes: Be aware of the red call box telephones in parking lots and walkways throughout campus. Use these telephones to be immediately connected with the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety Command Center.
  • Meeting someone new? If you plan to hang out with someone new, give a friend or family member a heads up on who you are meeting, where you are going and when you will return. Meet them in a public place, not your room, house or apartment. If you are in a public location, there will be people around to help.
  • If you are online dating, always consider the possibility that you are being videotaped and/or scammed before engaging in compromising behavior online.
  • Go on a first date with someone in a group. Group dates reduce the stress of focusing on one person the entire evening, especially if you are not sure how you feel about them
  • Don’t be afraid to hurt someone’s feelings. If you find yourself in an unsafe situation, it’s OK to lie. Make up an excuse as to why you have to go. It’s better to make up a reason to leave than to stay in a possibly dangerous situation. 
  • Always bring enough cash with you so you can take a cab or bus ride home.
  • Use your cell phone. Make sure it’s charged before you leave home and coordinate with a friend if you need to text him or her for a “friend-assist.” Also, make a plan in case your phone dies, so you can meet up with your friends at a familiar location at a certain time.
  • Be responsible and know your limits. Incidents of acquaintance Dating Violence are frequently related to the use of alcohol and drugs. If you’ve decided to drink, don’t accept it from people who you don’t know or trust. Don’t leave a drink unattended. If you have left your drink alone, get a new one. Always watch your drink being prepared. At parties, stick to drinks you got or prepared yourself instead of common open containers like punch bowls.
  • Understand that “no” means “no”! Respect sexual boundaries and familiarize yourself with the University’s definition of sexual consent (follow link for more information on Sexual Consent).
  • If you see something, say something! Intervene if you see a situation that seems risky to someone’s safety. By stepping up, you can possibly prevent a crime. Also, don’t be afraid to call school security.

Domestic/dating violence is also referred to as intimate partner or relationship violence. It is a pattern of behavior that is used to gain or maintain power or control over a partner. Abuse can be physical, sexual, emotional, economic or psychological acts or threats of action. It includes any behavior that frightens, intimidates, terrorizes, manipulates, hurts, humiliates, coerces, blames or injures someone. You may be in an abusive relationship if your partner:

  • Acts jealous when you talk to others, even friends
  • Criticizes what you do, what you wear and who your friends are
  • Does not listen to what you say or want
  • Controls you in small ways, such as by holding you too tightly or pulling you around by your hand
  • Always needs to know where you are and whom you are with
  • Easily becomes angry or violent
  • Tries to force you into sexual activity that you do not want
  • Insults you and calls you hurtful names
  • Degrades your gender with jokes
  • Threatens to hurt you or someone/something you care about
  • Emotionally or physically harms you and then shows remorse afterwards

Myths and Facts about Domestic and Dating Violence

Myth Fact
People who are abused contribute to the abuse in some way. Many people who are abused blame themselves for causing the violence, saying things like, “I shouldn’t have brought that subject up; I know how mad he/she gets.” No one is to blame for another person’s violence. Being abusive is always a choice and the sole responsibility of the person who is abusive.
People abuse their partners because they can’t control their anger. People who abuse others are not usually out of control. They do it to gain power and control over the other person. They often use tactics besides violence, such as threats, intimidation, psychological abuse and isolation from friends or family.
If a person stays in an abusive relationship, it must not be that bad. People stay in abusive relationships for many reasons, including fear, economics, dependence, confusion, lack of self-esteem, denial or the belief that the abuser needs their help.
Jealousy and possessiveness are signs of love. Jealousy and possessiveness are signs that a person sees you as a possession. It is the most common early warning sign of abuse.
Since there has never been any physical abuse, I am not a survivor of domestic/dating violence. Domestic/dating violence can take many forms, including emotional abuse, sexual abuse and verbal abuse.

Safety Tips

  • Program your phone. Save the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety’s phone number to your phone to have the number readily available in the event of an emergency. You can contact the command center, which is operated 24/7 at 516.877.3507 and 516.877.3511. You can also dial “5” from any campus phone.
  • Always trust your instincts. If you are uncomfortable in a situation, or you suspect something is wrong, you are probably right. Leave the situation. Don’t worry about what others think; safety comes first.
  • Be aware of your surroundings. Whether you’re walking home from the library or at a party, be mindful of potential risks. Get to know your campus or neighborhood and learn well-lit walking or driving routes. Think of a safe exit strategy. Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone nearby?
  • Red call boxes: Be aware of the red call box telephones in parking lots and walkways throughout campus. Use these telephones to be immediately connected with the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety Command Center.
  • Meeting Someone New? If you plan to hang out with someone new, give a friend or family member a heads up on who you are meeting, where you are going and when you will return. Meet them in a public place, not your room, house or apartment. If you are in a public location, there will be people around to help.
  • Go on a first date with someone in a group. Group dates reduce the stress of focusing on one person the entire evening, especially if you are not sure how you feel about them.
  • Don’t be afraid to hurt someone’s feelings. If you find yourself in an unsafe situation, it’s OK to lie. Make up an excuse as to why you have to go. It’s better to make up a reason to leave than to stay in a possibly dangerous situation.
  • Use your cell phone. Make sure it’s charged before you leave home and coordinate with a friend if you need to text him or her for a “friend-assist.” Also, make a plan in case your phone dies, so you can meet up with your friends at a familiar location at a certain time.
  • Be responsible and know your limits. Incidents of acquaintance Dating Violence/Domestic Violence are frequently related to the use of alcohol and drugs. If you’ve decided to drink, don’t accept drinks from people who you don’t know or trust. Don’t leave a drink unattended. If you have left your drink alone, get a new one. Always watch your drink being prepared. At parties, stick to drinks you got or prepared yourself instead of common open containers like punch bowls.
  • Make use of on-campus resources. Colleges/Universities often provide services to students including campus safety, wellness, medical, and psychological services.
  • Request a schedule or housing change. If you have classes with the perpetrator or live in the same building, you can request a change from your college/university administration. Federal and state laws require colleges to honor these requests. Contact the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards at 516.877.3612 or the Title IX Coordinator at 516.877.4819
  • Seek an order of protection or “no contact” order. Contact the Office of Student Conduct and  Community Standards at 516.877.3612 or the Title IX Coordinator at 516.877.4819 for a “no contact” order. You can view the Order of Protection information on the Adelphi University’s Written Notification Document or contact the Department of Public Safety and Transportation to assist you in obtaining one. 
  • Access off-campus support services. You can seek out resources located off campus through the Adelphi Unviersity’s Written Notification Document in addition to accessing the SUNY Sexual Assault and Violence Response (SAVR) Resources [Located on the Adelphi Unviersity Website]. 
  • Understand that “no” means “no”! Respect Sexual Boundaries and familiarize yourself with the University’s definition of sexual consent (follow link for more information on Sexual Consent).
  • If you see something, say something! Intervene if you see a situation that seems risky to someone’s safety. By stepping up you can possibly prevent a crime. Also, don’t be afraid to call school security.

Additional Resources:

  • In the event of a fire, call 911 first and then call the Department of Public Safety at 516.877.3511.
  • In the event that a fire seems to be extinguished, please call the Department of Public Safety Command Center at 516.877.3511. When calling, please provide as much information as possible about the location and if known, the date, time, and cause of the fire.
  • Educate yourself on fire safety by visiting the Public Safety Fire Safety website.
  • Understand all evacuation routes. Evacuating quickly is the key to survival. Review and become familiar with evacuation routes before an emergency. During a fire, one of the routes could be blocked. If this is the case, you will have to find another way out.
  • Be aware of the closest fire alarm. Should a fire start in the residence hall or apartment, make sure you are familiar with where the closest fire alarm is located. The quicker you pull the alarm, the better.
  • Don’t tamper with smoke detectors. Working smoke detectors are key in alerting of a fire and starting the evacuation process. If you disable a smoke alarm due to a problem, contact their University’s Public Safety department promptly.
  • Don’t block fire exit doors. In many residence halls and apartments space is limited. Never block entrances/exits with bikes, boxes, or furniture. In an emergency, you won’t have much time to move items.
  • Report damaged fire equipment to the appropriate staff. Fire equipment may be damaged accidentally or by vandalism. If you see damaged equipment, make sure to report it to the resident hall staff or the public safety department.
  • Be familiar with how to use a fire extinguisher. While the priority should be to evacuate the building, there may be a time that a fire extinguisher could be helpful. Trying to read the instructions during a fire isn’t a good idea.
  • Don’t be a practical joker. While pulling a fire alarm as a joke may seem harmless, it can have serious consequences. When a real fire starts, students may not take it seriously.
  • Do not stop to collect personal belongings and do not re-enter a burning building for any reason.
  • Do NOT use candles. Candles are prohibited in the University residence hall  rooms. If students are living off campus, candles can provide some amazing scents and a way to relax. However, you should never leave candles unattended or near clutter. Fires can start and spread very quickly.
  • Don’t smoke indoors. Smoke outside in designated smoking areas.
  • Keep an eye on small appliances. While most university students are enrolled in a meal plan, common appliances that can be kept in a residence hall room include microwave, coffee maker, and toaster. When using these appliances, you should stay close by. Also, before rushing off to class, you should make sure they have turned it off or unplugged it. Don’t forget about the curling iron or hair straightener.
  • Burning paper on bulletin boards or locating scorch marks are examples of ARSON. Call the Department of Public Safety immediately if you see these signs [516.877.3511].

While this is an exciting time of year, sometimes taking days or weeks to prepare for, there are nonetheless risks involved when going out at night. Being aware of possible risks is often the first step in staying safe, especially when in a new environment!

If you become alarmed or suspicious by any unusual activity call the Department of Public Safety for assistance at 516.877.3511 (off campus) or dial “5” from any campus phone. 

College-Age Tips

  1. Trust your instincts. If you feel spooked at any point during Halloween weekend, go with your gut. If you see something suspicious, contact the local authorities immediately.
  2. Avoid being alone or isolated with a goblin you don’t know well. Let a trusted friend know where you are and whom you are with at all times. If a goblin asks you to go somewhere, let him or her know you’d rather stay with the group.
  3. Know your surroundings and learn a bright jack-o-lantern route back to your car or dorm. Always carry emergency cash and store the phone numbers of local cab companies in your phone.
  4. When you are out with your friends, arrive together, check in with each other throughout the night and leave together. Form a buddy system so that no one wanders off alone and agree on a secret “butt- in” signal for uncomfortable situations, such as “Mummy!”
  5. Don’t accept “witch’s brew” from people you don’t know or trust and never leave your “witch’s brew” unattended. If you lose sight of your “witch’s brew,” get a new one.
  6. Don’t let your guard down. Don’t assume people you’ve just met will look out for your best interests; remember that they could be the Grim Reaper. Watch out for your friends. If a friend seems out of it, is way too intoxicated for the amount of alcohol they’ve had or is acting out of character, immediately get him or her to a safe place.

Parents with Children

  1. Ideally, an adult should accompany young children on Halloween. If your children go out on their own, be sure they wear a watch and carry a flashlight and cell phone. They should know when to be home and where to reach you in case of emergency.
  2. Plan costumes that are bright and reflective. Make sure that shoes fit well, masks are big enough to see clearly and capes are short enough to prevent tripping or entanglement.
  3. Although tampering is rare, tell children to bring the candy home to be inspected before consuming anything. Look at the wrapping carefully and toss out anything that looks paranormal.
  4. If Trick-or-Treating with a group of friends, your children should be aware of strangers. They should never enter a stranger’s home, no matter how nice the people seem. They should use the sidewalk and not cross lawns because you never know who may be lurking in a bush.
  5. Law enforcement authorities should be notified immediately of any suspicious or unlawful activity under the full moon.
  6. Avoid any haunted houses that could be dangerous. Only go to houses with a porch light on and never enter a house or car for a treat.

The Department of Public Safety and Transportation would like to wish the entire Adelphi community a happy and safe holiday season.

Please make time for safety and safety will make time for you.

Working together as a community, we will continue to ensure a safe environment for everyone at Adelphi University.

Travel be sure you have emergency supplies

  • Give yourself plenty of time to get where you are going.
  • Make sure your vehicle is in good repair.
  • If you drink…don’t drive; prearrange a designated driver.
  • Always use safety belts and child safety seats.
  • Maintain a safe distance between vehicles (no tailgating).
  • Get a good night’s sleep before traveling.
  • Avoid eating heavy meals, as this can lead to sleepiness.

Gift Giving for Children & Youth

  • Look for labels with age safety and advice.
  • Toys that produce loud noises can permanently damage hearing.
  • For families with children under 3, avoid toys with small parts.
  • Avoid choking hazards of cords or straps greater than 7 inches.

For children under 8:

  • Avoid toys with sharp edges and electric toys with heating parts or that must be plugged into an outlet.
  • Do not allow children under 8 to play with uninflated balloons or balloon pieces—they can present an aspiration/suffocation hazard.

Kitchen Keep children, pets, and toys away from cooking areas

  • Wear close fitting clothing when near cooking appliances.
  • Never leave cooking food on the stovetop unattended.
  • Keep hot foods, liquids and cords safely away from the edge.

Shopping Awareness is key

  • Place all gifts and packages in your trunk or out of sight.
  • Always be aware of your surroundings.
  • Park in well lighted areas.
  • Avoid shopping alone; there is safety in numbers.
  • Try to use credit or debit cards for purchases to avoid carrying large amounts of cash.
  • Keep your car doors locked and windows closed.
  • If you carry a purse or bag, carry it up close to your body.
  • When shopping online, only use major retailers or reputable websites.
  • Be sure to protect your credit card numbers and PIN at all times.
  • Report any lost or stolen credit cards immediately.
  • Check your credit report at least three times per year for unauthorized or suspicious activity.

Home Take gift storage and security precautions

  • Keep gifts away from windows.
  • Practice regular home security such as motion sensor lighting.
  • If traveling, postpone your mail and newspaper deliveries so your home doesn’t look deserted.
  • Do not store gifts in vehicles or unsecured areas.

Here are some tips you can use to avoid becoming a victim of cyber fraud:

  • Do not respond to unsolicited (spam) email.
  • Do not click on links contained within an unsolicited email.
  • Be cautious of email claiming to contain pictures in attached files, as the files may contain viruses. Only open attachments from known senders. Always run a virus scan on any attachment before opening.
  • Avoid filling out forms contained in email messages that ask for personal information.
  • Always compare the link in the email to the web address link you are directed to and determine if they match.
  • Log on directly to the official website for the business identified in the email, instead of linking to it via an unsolicited email. If the email appears to be from your bank, credit card issuer or other company you deal with frequently, your statements or official correspondence from the business will provide the proper contact information.
  • Contact the actual business that supposedly sent the email to verify that the email is genuine.
  • If you are asked to act quickly or told there is an emergency, it may be a scam. Fraudsters create a sense of urgency to get you to act impulsively.
  • If you receive a request for personal information from a business or financial institution, always look up the main contact information for the requesting company on an independent source (phone book, trusted internet directory, legitimate billing statement, etc.) and use that contact information to verify the legitimacy of the request.
  • Remember: If it looks too good to be true, it probably is.

To receive the latest information about cyber scams, please go to the FBI website and sign up for email alerts by clicking on one of the red envelopes. If you believe you have received a scam email, please notify the Internet Crime Complaint Center and file a complaint.

For more information on e-scams, please visit the FBI’s New E-Scams and Warnings page.

A Message from the County Executive:

Hurricane season officially runs from June through November but we should always be prepared for any type of disaster, whether natural or man-made. Using the information in this brochure, I urge you to prepare now and build your resilience, helping you and your community to be StormReady®.

A storm watch means storm conditions are possible whereas a storm warning means a storm is expected. For all hurricane watches and warnings, please take the threat seriously and follow the instructions issued by Nassau OEM and FEMA. To register your cell phone to receive emergency alert information, please see our Notify Me® page.

Nassau OEM works cooperatively with public and private agencies, law enforcement, and first responders to help protect the lives and property of Nassau County’s residents. Should the need arise to open shelters, OEM is ready to work with American Red Cross to ensure the safety of our residents and their loved ones. But our first responders can’t help you once they’re own lives are put in danger, so it is important that you follow evacuation instructions when they are issued, before a hurricane arrives.

Please use the information in our Hurricane Preparedness Guide (PDF) to check family emergency supplies, prepare “go kits” and to finalize a family plan for loved ones to follow. For more information please visit Nassau OEM online or FEMA’s preparedness website at Ready.gov.

View the hurricane preparedness checklist

Introduction

As Long Islanders, many of us may not feel threatened by hurricanes considering we survived Gloria, Floyd, Sandy and others. However, given our location as an island left vulnerable to the Atlantic Ocean, Nassau County is very susceptible to the powerful and destructive nature of hurricanes. 

Long Island has been threatened by, and at times hit with, hurricanes. And while it is estimated that 80 percent to 90 percent of people living in hurricane-prone areas think they have experienced the worst of a major hurricane, most likely they have not. People may have a false sense of what a major hurricane actually is or the potential damage it can cause. This is why it is important for residents to understand what a hurricane is, how hurricanes can affect our lives, and ways to better prepare in the event one strikes our area.

Hurricanes 

According to the National Hurricane Center, the term “hurricane” refers to tropical cyclones occurring in the Northern Hemisphere (“typhoon” refers to tropical cyclones in the Pacific). A hurricane is described as a powerful coastal storm with sustained winds above 74 mph and is defined by its immense size, duration, and destruction. Hurricane season is from June to November. 

When there is an impending hurricane, the National Weather Service (NWS) will monitor the potential storm and keep local emergency managers updated. When necessary, the NWS may issue either a hurricane watch or a hurricane warning:

  • Hurricane Watch – Issued for coastal areas when hurricane conditions are threatening to hit within 24 to 36 hours
  • Hurricane Warning – Issued for coastal areas when hurricane conditions are threatened to hit within 24 hours or less

Destruction of Hurricanes

Hurricanes have many after-effects including severe destruction and can cause additional hazards including:

  • Wreckage from buildings and downed trees, which may cause obstructions. 
  • Severe flooding causing possible injury or death and property damage. Some homes may become destroyed or unlivable. 
  • Damaged transportation infrastructures causing roads and railroads to be impassable. Road signs and traffic lights may be down or not working making travel difficult.  
  • Businesses may take several days to reopen and utilities, including electricity, gas, water, and telephone service, may be inoperable for a while. 
  • You may have difficulty reaching police, fire, and emergency departments, doctors, pharmacies, veterinarians, homecare providers, and other health agencies. 

The level and intensity of Hurricanes are categorized by the Saffir-Simpson scale and are as follows:

Category Sustained Winds Types of Damage Due to Hurricane Winds
1 74-95 mph Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days. Flooding on coastal roads.
2 96-110 mph Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.
3 (major) 111-129 mph Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes. Evacuation of low lying residences within several blocks of the shoreline possibly required.
4 (major) 130-156 mph Catastrophic damage will occur: Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Evacuation of residential areas will be necessary. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.
5  (major) 157 mph or higher Catastrophic damage will occur: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Mass evacuation of residential areas will be necessary. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

A Quick History of Hurricanes on Long Island

The New England Hurricane (also known as the Long Island Express) hit Long Island on September 21, 1938 as a Category 3 (winds 111 to 129 mph) and devastated the coast of Long Island with storm surges of 10 to 12 feet and was responsible for, in total, 700 deaths, $308 million in damage and 63,000 people homeless between Long Island and New England. The LI Express was so powerful that it created the Shinnecock Inlet and widened the Moriches Inlet in Suffolk County. 

The Great Atlantic Hurricane of 1944 was a Category 3 (winds 111 to 129mph) 

Hurricanes Carol and Edna of 1954 were both Category 3 hurricanes when they hit Long Island and Connecticut. 

Hurricane Donna of 1960 started as a Category 4 and hit Nassau County as a Category 3 (winds 111-129mph). 

Hurricane Gloria of 1985 began as a Category 3 hurricane when it hit Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, but was considered a Category 1 (winds 74-95 mph) when it reached Nassau County. Gloria devastated the U.S., causing  serious damage to Nassau County.

Hurricane Sandy of 2012 made landfall in New York as a Category 1 hurricane. A late-season hurricane combined with a Nor’easter at high tide during a full moon, Sandy produced long-lasting and devastating results not seen in generations.

Be Prepared Not Scared 

Although we cannot prevent hurricanes, we can certainly prepare for them. If you are prepared with food (items that require no refrigeration, preparation or cooking and little or no water) and water (1 gallon of water per person per day for at least five days), an emergency can be an inconvenience, not a disaster.

Everyone has a personal responsibility to be prepared. Creating an emergency plan ahead of time for you and your family will help you stay organized if a hurricane strikes. Your emergency plan should include a communication system, disaster supply kit and an alternate meeting place if your home is unsafe. Depending on the severity of the hurricane, you may need to evacuate where you live. When instructions are given to evacuate, you will be directed to a temporary, emergency refuge that will provide a safe haven for the duration of the storm. However, it is recommended that you seek refuge with a friend or family member located away from the affected area. You’ll be more comfortable on a friend’s couch than on a cot in a shelter.

Emergency Go Kits 

What you have on hand when a hurricane hits can make a big difference to how well your family handles it. In the event of a hurricane WATCH or WARNING, put these items into a smaller, portable Go Kit—such as a hands-free backpack or duffel bag—or a container, in case you need to evacuate. Keep it by your front door or an exit in case of an emergency evacuation. Each person should have a Go Kit. Create your own disaster preparedness kits—one for home and one to go as a “Go Bag” in case you need to evacuate—with enough supplies for everyone in your household for FIVE days.

Personal Go Kit

Your family disaster preparedness kits should include:

  • First aid kit. Pack a “how-to” guide as well
  • Medications: Essential prescription, nonprescription items and medical information
  • Battery-powered flashlight and radio (or crank radio), extra batteries and a 12-hour glow stick
  • Clothing: A change of clothes, plus rainwear, sturdy shoes and protective gloves for everyone
  • Personal items: Eyeglasses, personal care items and comfort items
  • Important document copies in a waterproof container:
  • Drivers’ licenses
  • Wills
  • Birth and marriage certificates
  • Insurance policies
  • Proof of residence (deed or lease)
  • Recent tax returns
  • Credit card & bank account numbers
  • Social Security cards
  • Passport numbers
  • Home inventory list
  • Items for infants, elderly, pets or loved ones with special need

Pet Go Kit

  • Your pet disaster preparedness kits should include:
  • Your pets’ names
  • Your name, address, phone and cell number
  • Emergency contact—friend or family
  • Your veterinarian’s name and contact information
  • Medical records and medications
  • Specific care instructions and behavioral problems
  • First aid kit
  • Current photos
  • Sturdy leash with collar or harness
  • Muzzles, if necessary
  • Paper towels for clean-up
  • Food (3 days supply) and manual can opener
  • Bottled water and water purification tablets
  • Bowls, toys and other comfort items
  • Treats, brushes, combs
  • Newspapers and plastic trash bags for handling waste
  • Also have on hand, ready to go:
    • Secure carriers large enough for your pets to stand comfortably, turn around and lie down
    • Towels or blankets for bedding and warmth
    • Cat litter and litter box

For more information, visit the Nassau County Pet Safe Coalition website petsafecoalition.org 

Emergency Notification System

A common concern from residents in the County is “How will I know when I need to evacuate?” To answer that question, Nassau County has installed an Emergency Notification System that will allow the County to call the home phones of residents in an affected area within a very short time. The county will be able to call any landline telephone within a given area and send a recorded message with instructions. The system will be able to make 3,000 phone calls per minute. Working in conjunction with the State’s NY ALERT program, Nassau County also has the ability to get the same message to all cell phones in the same area. It is important that if you have caller ID and see a call from “Nassau County” that you answer the call to get timely information.

Protecting Pets and Animals

Pets are not allowed in shelters. Be sure to make sheltering plans for your pet(s). If you cannot make necessary provisions for your pet, you may want to contact the Pet Safe Coalition Inc. to learn about its “PetSafe” shelter program by visiting petsafecoalition.org. You may also contact the Nassau County Office of Emergency Management at 516.573.0636 for guidance. Service animals are allowed in Nassau County shelters. If you bring your service animal with you, have water, food, medicines, toys and other necessities.

People with Disabilities

If you have any specialized needs, be sure to take them into consideration when developing your emergency plan for hurricanes. For more information, contact Nassau County Office of Emergency Management and request the brochure on Emergency Preparedness for People with Disabilities. 

Work and School

Every workplace and school should have an evacuation plan and emergency procedures. Become familiar with evacuation plans in areas where you spend a great deal of time. You may want to store a few essential items at these locations as well. 

View the Adelphi University Emergency Operations Plan

Nassau County Contact Information
Remember: 911 Calls Are For Emergency Situations Only

  • TTY Relay Operator  800.421.1220
  • Nassau County Office of Emergency Management   516.573.0636
  • Nassau County Office of Emergency Management email             NCOEM@nassaucountyny.gov
  • Nassau County Main Number   516.571.3000
  • Nassau County American Red Cross   516.747.3500
  • Nassau County Police   516.573.7000
  • Town of North Hempstead   516.627.0590
  • Town of Hempstead   516.489.5000
  • Town of Oyster Bay   516.677.5757
  • City of Glen Cove   516.676.2000
  • Glen Cove Police Department   516.676.1000
  • City of Long Beach   516.431.1000
  • City of Long Beach Police Department   516.431.1800
  • PSEG   800.490.0075
  • National Grid   800.490.0045
  • SPCA   516.843.7722
  • NICE Bus   516.228.4000
  • LIRR   718.217.5477

 

Additional Web Resources

Government/Agency:

Weather-Related

Members of cults periodically recruit at colleges and universities. They know that there are times when college students are especially vulnerable to their recruiting techniques. Knowing how to identify a cult and its members can help you avoid becoming a victim. Be aware of individuals or groups:

  • Who are overly friendly
  • You hardly know who try to give you gifts or other tokens of friendship with no strings attached
  • Who pressure you because “everyone is doing it”
  • Who can’t take “no” for an answer and try to make you feel guilty for rejecting them
  • With magical solutions to your problems
  • Who make demands on the use of your personal finances
  • Who want to isolate you from your friends and family
  • Who claim to have a special relationship to God.
  • Who want to control your way of life or way of looking at things
  • Who are excessively judgmental about your life or faith
  • Who are unwilling to give you a straight answer to your questions

We all feel vulnerable at some time in our lives. If there is a time when you feel like your world is falling apart and you’re alone and overwhelmed by decisions you must make, turn to someone you know well and can trust (an old friend, family member, counselor, teacher, coach, adviser, residence hall director, RA, PALs, the Offices of Student Life, Campus Ministries or a crisis hotline).

Larceny-Theft is the unlawful taking, carrying, leading or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another. The lowest-level theft offense in New York is called “petit larceny,” or petty theft, which is the unlawful taking of property or services valued at no more than $1,000. The highest level of theft offense in New York is called “grand larceny,” or grand theft, which is the unlawful taking of property or services valued at more than $1,000. 

Crime survivors are not responsible for their victimization; perpetrators are accountable for their crimes and the outcomes of their actions. The following safety information may help reduce the possibility of becoming a victim of a crime.

  • Program your phone. Save the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety’s phone number to your phone to have the number readily available in the event of an emergency. You can contact the command center, which is operated 24/7 at 516.877.3507 and 516.877.3511. You can also dial “5” from any campus phone.
  • Always trust your instincts. If you are uncomfortable in a situation, or you suspect something is wrong, you are probably right. Leave the situation. Don’t worry about what others think; safety comes first.
  • Be alert and aware of your surroundings. If you detect any suspicious activity and are concerned about your safety, immediately respond to a location where you can call for assistance (i.e., emergency phones, emergency call boxes).
  • Red call boxes: Be aware of the red call box telephones in parking lots and walkways throughout campus. Use these telephones to be immediately connected with the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety Command Center.
  • Never leave personal belongings unattended. Whether you are in a lab, office, the library, etc., unwatched articles invite thieves, regardless of how long you will be gone (even a couple of minutes).
  • Lock your door each time you leave your room, office or lab. Most thefts in the university environment occur in unlocked areas.
  • Keep your doors locked at all times. Do not prop self-locking doors but do report defective locks to the locksmith immediately through the Footprints Work Order System or by contacting the locksmith at ext. 3512 or Public Safety at ext. 3500.
  • Do not allow any individual into your room, office or lab if you do not know who they are, if they are not authorized or if they are not supervised.
  • If you see something, say something! Don’t be afraid to call school security.

Additional Resources:

Property Theft Brochure

Motor vehicles are the primary mode of transportation for most of us, and often an indispensable part of our lives. But what would happen if your vehicle suddenly disappeared or if it was broken into. This can all occur whether a vehicle is parked on the street, a driveway or parking lot. Protect your vehicle and yourself by following these safety tips.

Crime survivors are not responsible for their victimization; perpetrators are accountable for their crimes and the outcomes of their actions. The following safety information may help reduce the possibility of becoming a victim of a crime.

  • Program your phone. Save the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety’s phone number to your phone to have the number readily available in the event of an emergency. You can contact the command center, which is operated 24/7 at 516.877.3507 and 516.877.3511. You can also dial “5” from any campus phone.
  • Always trust your instincts. If you are uncomfortable in a situation, or you suspect something is wrong, you are probably right. Leave the situation. Don’t worry about what others think; safety comes first.
  • Be alert and aware of your surroundings. If you detect any suspicious activity and are concerned about your safety, immediately respond to a location where you can call for assistance (i.e., emergency phones, emergency call boxes).
  • Red call boxes: Be aware of the red call box telephones in parking lots and walkways throughout campus. Use these telephones to be immediately connected with the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety Command Center.
  • Never leave personal belongings unattended. Whether you are in a lab, office, the library, vehicle, etc., unwatched articles invite thieves, regardless of how long you will be gone (even a couple of minutes).
  • Leave nothing exposed in the vehicle. Place items in your trunk prior to leaving a parked car or take the items with you. 
  • Lock your door each time you leave your vehicle. Most thefts in the university environment occur in unlocked areas.
  • When returning to your vehicle, have your keys in hand so you’re not fumbling for them 
  • Keep your doors locked at all times. Do not leave your vehicle door open and leave even if it is for a minute or two. That is more than enough time for someone to take items from your vehicle or to take your vehicle.
  • Do not allow any individual into your vehicle if you do not know who they are.
  • Check the front and back seats of your car before entering.
  • Drive with car doors locked and windows mostly closed. Do not leave your purse or other valuables on the seat next to you while you are driving. Put valuable items in the trunk or behind your seat, out of view.
  • Invest in an ignition lock, club-type lock and car alarm system. Your car insurance will be reduced and you are less likely to find that your car has been stolen.
  • Never park your car in a remote or dimly lit area. If you feel unsafe, call Public Safety.

There are help-wanted ads everywhere; in the press, on bulletin boards, in the University Center, residence halls, academic buildings, lampposts, supermarkets and more. Students should use caution when responding to ads especially if they are not affiliated with Adelphi.

  • Be aware of suspicious criteria for positions.
  • Always go with a friend when responding to ads.
  • If the premises make you feel uneasy, do not continue to pursue the job.
  • Be wary if ads promise salaries that are much higher than you might expect.
  • Be especially cautious when employment is in a home or apartment.

There is no such thing as easy money. Little work for a high salary is a signal for trouble.

  • Always have your keys ready.
  • Secure all locks even if you are at your residence or if you only leave for a few minutes.
  • Use the peephole and ask who is at the door before opening it.
  • No strangers should be admitted into your residence without proper identification and a call to verify their identity.
  • Never lend keys.
  • Never reveal your name, address, or other personal information to an anonymous caller.
  • Report lost or stolen keys. Have locks changed immediately.
  • Report stolen property immediately for insurance and recovery purposes.
  • Record the serial number, model brand name, and description of all valuables for future references. Keep duplicate copies of this list in a separate location from the original. Remember the stolen property cannot be recovered unless it can be positively identified.
  • Join Operation I.D. to protect your valuables. For information call 516.877.3500
  • Do not let strangers in to make phone calls. Take the number and make the phone call for them.
  • If you open your door and suspect that someone you don’t know is inside,do not enter. Find a phone, call 911, and report a “burglary in progress.”
  • If you walk into your building and find suspicious individuals loitering there, do not enter—call 911 for help.
  • Leave a light and/or radio on while you are away.
  • If you plan to be away from home for an extended period, stop all newspaper deliveries and have the post office hold your mail or have a friend collect it for you.
  • Know which of your neighbors you can call in case of an emergency.
  • Be aware of your surroundings. When entering or leaving your apartment, be sure you can retreat if necessary. If you encounter a suspicious person in your hallway, you might ring your own bell and then leave when there is no answer. Don’t lead a suspicious person to your apartment.

Be aware of your surroundings!

  • Program your phone. Save the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety’s phone number to your phone to have the number readily available in the event of an emergency. You can contact the command center, which is operated 24/7 at 516.877.3507 and 516.877.3511. You can also dial “5” from any campus phone.
  • Always trust your instincts. If you are uncomfortable in a situation or you suspect something is wrong, you are probably right. Leave the situation. Don’t worry about what others think; safety comes first.
  • Be aware of your surroundings. Whether you’re walking home from the library or a party, be mindful of potential risks. Get to know your campus or neighborhood and learn well-lit walking or driving routes. Think of a safe exit strategy. Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone nearby?
  • Red call boxes: Be aware of the red call box telephones in parking lots and walkways throughout campus. Use these telephones to be immediately connected with the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety Command Center.
  • Be assertive, set limits and stick to them. Communicate your limits and if they are ignored, act quickly and forcefully and don’t be afraid to “make a scene.”
  • Always go out with friends, but be prepared to take care of yourself. Do not assume others will look out for your well-being.
  • Use your cell phone. Make sure it’s charged before you leave home and coordinate with a friend if you need to text him or her for a “friend-assist.” Also, make a plan in case your phone dies, so you can meet up with your friends at a familiar location at a certain time.
  • Wait for people to earn your trust. High school or college can foster a false sense of security. Don’t assume people you don’t know well will look out for your best interests.
  • Stick with your friends. Arrive at events together, check in with one another throughout, and leave together. Think twice about going off alone and if, for whatever reason, you have to separate from your friends, let them know where you are going and who you are with.
  • Watch out for your friends. If a friend seems out of it or is way too intoxicated, get him or her to a safe place.
  • Don’t be afraid to hurt someone’s feelings. If you find yourself in an unsafe situation, it’s OK to lie. Make up an excuse as to why you have to go. It’s better to make up a reason to leave than to stay in a possibly dangerous situation.
  • Understand that “no” means “no”! Respect sexual boundaries and familiarize yourself with the University’s definition of sexual consent (follow link for more information on Sexual Consent).
  • Be responsible and know your limits. Incidents of acquaintance sexual assaults are frequently related to the use of alcohol and drugs. If you’ve decided to drink, don’t accept drinks from people you don’t know or trust. Don’t leave a drink unattended. If you have left your drink alone, get a new one. Always watch your drink being prepared. At parties, stick to drinks you got or prepared yourself instead of common open containers like punch bowls.
  • Think about your info on social networking sites. Broadcasting your whereabouts reveals details to everyone. Keep it vague so that someone can’t track your every move.
  • If you see something, say something! Intervene if you see a situation that seems risky to someone’s safety. By stepping up you can possibly prevent a crime. Also, don’t be afraid to call school security.
  • Make use of on-campus resources. Colleges/universities often provide services to students including campus safety, wellness, medical and psychological services.
  • Request a schedule or housing change. If you have classes with the perpetrator or live in the same building, you can request a change from your college/university administration. Federal and state laws require colleges to honor these requests. Contact the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards at 516.877.3612 or the Title IX Coordinator at 516.877.4819
  • Seek an order of protection or “no contact” order. Contact the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards at 516.877.3612 or the Title IX Coordinator at 516.877.4819 for a “no contact” order. You can view the Order of Protection information on the Adelphi University’s Written Notification Document or contact the Department of Public Safety and Transportation to assist you in obtaining one. 
  • Access off-campus support services. You can seek out resources located off campus through the Adelphi Unviersity’s Written Notification Document in addition to accessing the SUNY Sexual Assault and Violence Response (SAVR) Resources.

Myths and Facts about Sexual Assaults

Myth Fact
The person asked for it. No one asks to be sexually assaulted. No one deserves to be sexually assaulted because of their clothing, behavior, appearance or for any other reason.
It can’t happen to me. Anyone can be a victim of sexual assault, regardless of their age, race, gender, sexual orientation, educational background or income level.
The primary motive for rape is sex. Rape is a crime of power, violence and control.
Rape only occurs among strangers. 70 percent of rape cases are committed by someone known to the victim.
No one can be forced to have sex against their will. Anyone can be forced to have sex against their will by the threat or use of force.
Most rape victims suffer visible physical injury from the incident. More than two-thirds of all rape victims do not sustain any visible physical injuries from their attack.

Additional Resources:

Community Support Services:

Adelphi University offers On-Campus Community Support services including the Adelphi Student Counseling Center 516.877.3646, Health Services Center 516.877.6000, and Pastoral Counseling Interfaith Center, 516.877.3113. Adelphi also partners with experts who will provide support services to victims of sexual assault. Community support services near Adelphi locations include: The Safe Center LI 24-hour Hotline: 516.542.0404; Long Island Crisis Center Online/Mobile Chat Counseling longislandcrisiscenter.org

 

For any site you use, review the website’s safety notifications, standards, and learn how to report violating content. Most often it will be disclosed at the registration phase. Otherwise, might be noted at the bottom of the site. This information will educate users about the function of their website in regard to Internet safety.

Understand that people are not who they claim they are. You wouldn’t reveal your personal details to just anyone, would you? Don’t post it on your profile unless you want everyone (including bad people) to see it. Don’t agree to meet anyone online unless you specifically know that person.

If you wish to meet someone, do it safely. This discretion can be a difficult one to judge, but if you do choose to meet someone online, make sure you’re in a safe location. It is suggested to meet them in a large mall mainly because it’s public, indoors, safe and provides either of you the option of running errands if you don’t wish to meet. Bring a friend with you just to be safe and have a good time.

Be careful–social networking is a double-edged sword. It’s okay to have fun and connect with other people on social networks, but just be alert to the fact that criminals may prey on others. Take precautions to prevent possible negative outcomes.

Set your profile to “Private” to screen outsiders. Most social networks will permit you to make your profile private to prevent outside individuals from viewing your information. This enables you to reach out to others who you are friends with, but exclude incoming profile requests.

Maintain your computer’s defenses. As a general precaution, it’s important to make sure you have an updated anti-virus, firewall, anti-spyware and operating system updates. It’s been noted previously, some advertisements contain malicious code and can infect your computer system. 

Consider using a fake name or alias. There is no need to use your real name on social networks.

Don’t get phished. Phishing is a common tactic of spammers to compromise someone else’s account and send messages purporting their products. Take a moment to understand how to properly log-in to the social network. Don’t click links you didn’t ask for or expect. If a link prompts you to log in, it’s most likely a phishing scam.

If you become alarmed or suspicious about any unusual activity or have information regarding an incident, call the Department of Public Safety and Transportation for assistance at 516.877.3511 (off campus) or dial “5” from any campus phone.

Although many students go home, work or stay on campus, others travel to destinations such as Cancun, Mexico; Gatlinburg, Tennessee; or Panama City, Florida.

Such trips frequently involve the combination of large crowds and alcohol. It is particularly important for students to be aware of their own safety and the safety of their friends.

Safety Tips to Consider

  • Travel with a reputable travel agency.
  • Know what kind of transportation, housing, and food and beverages are included in your travel package.
  • If you don’t know anything about the travel agency, call the State Consumer Protection Division to find out if there are any complaints against the agency.

If you plan on drinking as part of your spring break experience, consider the following:

  • Know the alcohol laws at your destination. Ask your travel agent for information on age of consumption and local laws regarding alcohol use. Some areas will ticket for open intoxicants, while others may have stiff penalties for public inebriation.
  • Plan ahead on how much you plan to drink. Talk with a friend about when the friend should intervene and make a plan for how you will return to your hotel. Stay with someone who knows you when you are drinking-don’t wander off alone. Make sure someone in your group is not drinking or is drinking responsibly so they can get everyone home safely.
  • Don’t assume that someone you’ve just met will look out for your best interests. Keep in mind that more people are sexually assaulted by acquaintances than by strangers.
  • Only accept drinks from a licensed bartender or drinks that you pour yourself. You put yourself at risk for receiving an altered beverage if you don’t know the source of the drink.
  • If a friend feels sick, don’t leave them alone. If you feel sick, ask someone to look out for you.
  • If a member of your group passes out, turn them on their side to prevent choking and call 911 immediately.
  • Don’t horseplay or climb on balconies. Never sit on railings and always keep both feet on the floor at all times. Falls from balconies, even those on lower floors, can be fatal.
  • Don’t carry all of your credit or bank cards in your wallet or purse. Carry the minimum amount of cash that you will need, including a little backup. Traveler’s checks are your best bet when on vacation. If you have extra cash, put it in the hotel safe.
  • Make sure your friends and relatives know where you will be vacationing, when you will depart, and when you expect to return. Call friends or family members to let them know that you have arrived and returned safely.
  • If you are robbed, don’t resist-give up any money, jewelry, or other valuables. You can always replace material things. Call 911 as soon as you can.

View the State Department’s website information on Spring Break

International Travel

All travelers must show proof of identity and citizenship when entering the United States from Canada, Mexico, Bermuda, and other countries of the Caribbean by land or sea. Acceptable documents include a U.S. passport, U.S. passport card, trusted traveler card or enhanced driver’s license. (U.S. citizens who do not have a single document verifying identity and citizenship must present both an identification and citizenship document, for example, a driver’s license and either a copy of a birth certificate or a naturalization certificate.) The U.S. Department of State’s Website is an excellent source of information for those traveling abroad.

  • Do your research beforehand to make sure your destination is safe before you leave. 
  • Visit  the US Department of State’s “Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) and register yourself. This is a free service that allows U.S. citizens traveling or living abroad to receive the latest security updates from the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. Benefits of enrolling in STEP;
  • You’ll receive the latest safety and security information for your destination country, so you can make informed decisions about your travel.
  • The information you provide enables the U.S. embassy or consulate to contact you in an emergency.

Traveling to Mexico

Due to a recent rise in violence along the U.S.-Mexico border, students should take extra precautions if traveling to Mexico this spring break. The U.S. Department of State has issued travel alerts for Mexico. Travel alerts are issued by the federal government to warn U.S. citizens during times of heightened crime and unrest in other countries. Key points include:

  • The nature of violent crimes throughout Mexico and how the Mexican government is responding
  • Locations and situations of particular concern
  • Precautions include registering travel plans with the U.S. State Department, keeping passport and emergency information at all times during travel, becoming familiar with international law and not traveling with expensive items or excessive amounts of cash
  • Consulate contact information.

Road Trip Advice

Students who are traveling by car are reminded that driving while tired is as dangerous as driving intoxicated. Activity breaks can help the driver stay alert. It is helpful to take turns at the wheel to prevent fatigue. Whenever possible, stay on well-traveled roads where it is easier to get assistance when needed.

Whether traveling within the states or abroad, students are urged to notify someone at home of their travel plans, and to check in daily to confirm that your trip is progressing smoothly.

Stalking is a course of unwanted conduct directed at a particular person, designed for no legitimate purpose, and which places the person or a third person in reasonable fear of physical, emotional or mental harm. Stalking can take many forms, including:

  • Unwanted visits
  • Following
  • Driving by your home or place of business
  • Threatening or harassing phone calls
  • Unwanted digital communication
  • Cyberstalking through unlawful video surveillance, posting unwanted pictures or videos, revenge porn, messages and other harassing behavior online

Safety Tips

  • Report the activity to Campus Public Safety or your local police. Save the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety’s phone number to your phone to have the number readily available in the event of an emergency. You can contact the command center, which is operated 24/7 at 516.877.3507 and 516.877.3511. You can also dial “5” from any campus phone.
  • Always trust your instincts. If you are uncomfortable in a situation, or you suspect something is wrong, you are probably right. Leave the situation. Don’t worry about what others think; safety comes first.
  • Be aware of your surroundings. Whether you’re walking home from the library or at a party, be mindful of potential risks. Get to know your campus or neighborhood and learn well-lit walking or driving routes. Think of a safe exit strategy. Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone nearby?
  • Red call boxes: Be aware of the red call box telephones in parking lots and walkways throughout campus. Use these telephones to be immediately connected with the Adelphi University Department of Public Safety Command Center.
  • Use your cell phone. Make sure it’s charged before you leave home and coordinate with a friend if you need to text him or her for a “friend-assist.” Also, make a plan in case your phone dies, so you can meet up with your friends at a familiar location at a certain time.
  • Don’t be afraid to hurt someone’s feelings. Send a clear message to the person that the relationship is over. Do not be ambivalent.
  • If you are being stalked, attempt to avoid all contact with the stalker. Keep an accurate journal of all incidents such as sightings (include date and time), contacts, phone calls, written correspondence, and unusual incidents that may be connected. Keep all letters, packages and taped phone messages. Trace all phone calls per telephone company instructions.
  • Inform family, friends, neighbors, management, co-workers and workplace security. Have them notify you or the police if they are contacted or followed by the stalker.
  • Understand that “no” means “no”! Respect sexual boundaries and familiarize yourself with the University’s definition of sexual consent (follow link for more information on Sexual Consent).
  • If you see something, say something! Intervene if you see a situation that seems risky to someone’s safety. By stepping up you can possibly prevent a crime. Also, don’t be afraid to call school security.
  • Make use of on-campus resources. Colleges/Universities often provide services to students including campus safety, wellness, medical, and psychological services.
  • Request a schedule or housing change. If you have classes with the perpetrator or live in the same building, you can request a change from your college/university administration. Federal and state laws require colleges to honor these requests. Contact the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards at 516.877.3612 or the Title IX Coordinator at 516.877.4819
  • Seek an order of protection or “no contact” order. Contact the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards at 516.877.3612 or the Title IX Coordinator at 516.877.4819 for a “no contact” order. You can view the Order of Protection information on the Adelphi University’s Written Notification Document or contact the Department of Public Safety and Transportation to assist you in obtaining one. 
  • Access off-campus support services. You can seek out resources located off campus through the Adelphi Unviersity’s Written Notification Document in addition to accessing the SUNY Sexual Assault and Violence Response (SAVR) Resources.

Additional Resources:

Subways are a New York City way of life. They are fast and can get you almost anywhere in the city. Most lines run 24 hours a day and, with caution and common sense, subways can be a safe trip.

  • During non-rush hours, wait for trains in the “off-hours waiting areas” established by the Metropolitan Transit Authority.
  • Ride in the center car, near the conductor, during non-rush hours.
  • Don’t fall asleep on the train
  • Whenever possible, travel with a friend
  • Stand away from the edge of the platform.
  • Do not display money or jewelry. 
  • Keep necklaces and rings out of sight.
  • Use main exits, especially at night.
  • Hold your handbag and other possessions securely.
  • Change cars if you are bothered by other passengers or feel uncomfortable.
  • Do not engage strangers in conversation.
  • Do not stand at the edge of the platform while waiting.

Fun in the Sun

The first, and best, line of defense against the sun is covering up. Wear a hat with a three-inch brim or a bill facing forward, sunglasses (ones that block 99 percent to 100 percent of ultraviolet rays) and cotton clothing with a tight weave.

  • Stay in the shade whenever possible, and limit sun exposure during the peak intensity hours—between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
  • On both sunny and cloudy days use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or greater that protects against UVB and UVA rays.
  • Be sure to apply enough sunscreen—about one ounce per sitting for a young adult.
  • Reapply sunscreen every two hours, or after swimming or sweating.
  • Use extra caution near water and sand (and even snow!) as they reflect UV rays and may result in sunburn more quickly.

Heat Stress in Exercising

  • The intensity of activities that last 15 minutes or more should be reduced whenever high heat and humidity reach critical levels.
  • At the beginning of a strenuous exercise program or after traveling to a warmer climate, the intensity and duration of exercise should be limited initially and then gradually increased during a period of 10 to 14 days to accomplish acclimatization to the heat.
  • Before prolonged physical activity, the child should be well-hydrated. During the activity, periodic drinking should be enforced, for example, each 20 minutes, 5 oz of cold tap water or a flavored sports drink for a child weighing 90 lbs, and 9 oz for an adolescent weighing 130 lbs, even if the child does not feel thirsty.
  • Clothing should be light-colored and lightweight and limited to one layer of absorbent material to facilitate evaporation of sweat. Sweat-saturated shirts should be replaced by dry clothing.
  • Practices and games played in the heat should be shortened and more frequent water/hydration breaks should be instituted.

Bug Safety

  • Don’t use scented soaps, perfumes or hair sprays.
  • Avoid areas where insects nest or congregate, such as stagnant pools of water, uncovered foods and gardens where flowers are in bloom.
  • Avoid dressing in clothing with bright colors or flowery prints.
  • To remove a visible stinger from skin, gently back it out by scraping it off horizontally with a credit card or your fingernail.
  • Combination sunscreen/insect repellent products should be avoided because sunscreen needs to be reapplied every two hours, but the insect repellent should not be reapplied.
  • Use insect repellents containing DEET when needed to prevent insect related diseases such as ticks which can transmit Lyme Disease, and mosquitoes which can transmit West Nile Virus and other viruses.
  • The current CDC and AAP recommendation for children over 2 months of age is to use 10-30 percent DEET.  DEET should not be used on children under 2 months of age.
  • The effectiveness is similar for 10-30 percent  DEET but the duration of effect varies. Ten percent DEET provides protection for about 2 hours; 30 percent  for about 5 hours—choose the lowest concentration that will provide required length of coverage.
  • The concentration of DEET varies significantly from product to product, so read the label of any product you purchase. Children should wash off repellents when back indoors.
  • As an alternative to DEET, Picaridin has become available in the U.S. in concentrations of 5-10 percent.

For more information on DEET, visit aapnews.org

Reporting Intruders or Suspicious Activity

At times people return to their work locations and observe a stranger. The stranger usually has a “‘cover story,” such as looking for employment, or trying to find someone. Regardless of the story provided, take close notice of the stranger’s appearance, age, height, weight and clothing and notify Public Safety.

Do not forcefully confront intruders or pursue them when they flee. Such action involves a high degree of risk, and can result in assaults upon members of the university’s community. It is far more advisable to be able to provide a good description of the stranger and the direction of flight. Then notify Public Safety immediately.

One method that has proven quite successful is to simply say “May I help you?” If the person is an intruder, the chances are quite high a “cover story” will exist, and the person will leave the area. While you are listening to the story, you can get a good look at the person and be able to provide an accurate description for the Public Safety officer.

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