Date & Time: February 21 7:00pm – 8:00pm
Location: Ruth S. Harley University Center, Ballroom

Micah Oelze, PhD will sing, play his guitar, and talk about the Caribbean movers who turned their racial and political activism into song.

Micah Oelze

Like no other city, New York has given the world an unparalleled soundtrack. But where did the singers come from and get their inspiration? How many of us remember that Bob Marley wrote lyrics based on New York City street philosophy and racial activism? That Busta Rhymes and Notorious B.I.G. grew up in Jamaican immigrant households? Or that Cuba’s most famous song was written by a Cuban commuting between New York City and the Catskill Mountains?

Join Adelphi Assistant Professor Micah Oelze, PhD in a presentation performance that uses music and history to reveal the untold story of the Caribbean movers who turned their racial and political activism into song. These were the very actors who turned New York City into a musical powerhouse. 

This in-person event is free and open to the public. Registration is required.

This event is sponsored by the John Hope Franklin Distinguished Lecture, the Center for African, Black and Caribbean Studies and the Center for Academic Support and Enrichment.

For any questions or concerns about this event, please contact:

Fabian Burrell
fburrell@adelphi.edu or cabcs@adelphi.edu
516.877.4979 

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