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Harvey Hall 210

Martha Cooley is the author of two novels–The Archivist (Little Brown, 1998), a New York Times bestseller also published in a dozen foreign markets, and Thirty-Three Swoons (Little Brown, 2005), as well as a memoir-in-essays, Guesswork: A Reckoning With Loss (Catapult, 2017). A new novel will be forthcoming from Red Hen in 2021.

With Antonio Romani, she co-translated Antonio Tabucci’s Time Ages in a Hurry (Archipelago Books, 2015). Her co-translations have appeared in such venues as Guernica, Tin House, Massachusetts Review, and Atlanta Review.

She is the winner of an O. Henry Prize for Short Fiction (2017) and was cited for a Notable essay in Best American Essays (2013). Her short fiction, essays, and co-translations have appeared in A Public Space, AGNI, The Common, LARB, the Writer’s Chronicle, and PEN America, among other journals. She was for 15 years a member of the core faculty of the Bennington Writing Seminars in Bennington, Vermont.

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Harvey Hall 212

Igor Webb was born in Slovakia and grew up in the Inwood neighborhood of New York City. His poems have appeared in The New Yorker and Poetry (Chicago). Among his publications are Christopher Smart’s Cat (Dos Madress Press, 2018), Rereading the Nineteenth Century (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010) and the memoir Against Capitulation (Quartet Books, 1984).  His story “Reza Says,” originally published in The Hudson Review, was selected as a Distinguished Story for Best American Short Stories, 2012. His essay “Horatio Hornblower” was reprinted in Literary Awakenings: Personal Essays From The Hudson Review (2017). Igor Webb has been a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, a Leverhulme Fellow and a winner of a National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowship.

Jacqueline Jones LaMon

Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
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Nexus Building 312

Jacqueline Jones LaMon is the author of two poetry collections—Last Seen, a Felix Pollak Poetry Prize selection, and Gravity, U.S.A., recipient of the Quercus Review Press Poetry Series Book Award—and the novel In the Arms of OneWho Loves Me. A graduate of Mount Holyoke College and UCLA School of Law, LaMon earned her M.F.A. in Creative Writing, Poetry, from Indiana University Bloomington.

LaMon’s work has appeared in a wide variety of publications, including Poetry, Ninth Letter, Mythium, Bellevue LiteraryReview, Callaloo and Crab Orchard Review. Noted by the NAACP in the category of Outstanding Literature, Poetry, LaMon served as president of Cave Canem Foundation, Inc., an organization committed to cultivating the artistic and professional growth of African American poets.

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Harvey Hall 218

Judith Baumel, Founding Director of the Creative Writing Program at Adelphi, is a poet, critic, and translator.  She also lectures on modern and contemporary American poetry at Oxford University, UK.  A former director of the Poetry Society of America, her poetry, translations and essays have been published in PoetryThe Yale ReviewAgni ReviewThe Common, The New York Times, and The New Yorker, among other places.  Her work is represented in a number of anthologies including Telling and Remembering: A Century of Jewish American PoetryGondola Signore Gondola: Poems on Venice; and Poems of New York (Everyman’s Library Pocket Poets).

Her books of poetry are The Weight of Numbers (Wesleyan University Press, 1988) for which she won the Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets; Now (University of Miami Press, 1996); Kangaroo Girl (GenPop Books, 2011); and Passeggiate (Arrowsmith Press, 2019).

Judith was born in The Bronx, attended The Bronx High School of Science, Radcliffe College (Harvard University) and The Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars.  She combines her urban, Jewish upbringing with her early academic work in the physical sciences.  Her work is about memory and accommodation, greed and hunger, lust and rage.  At times funny, at turns deeply spiritual and philosophical, Judith confronts a range of contemporary subjects, from race relations to motherhood, modern Jewish experience to popular music.  She has received awards from The New York Foundation for the Arts, Bronx Recognizes Its Own, Laurence Goldstein Award in Poetry from MQR, and fellowships for residencies at Yaddo, Saltonstall, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and Millay, among others. She lives in The Bronx.

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Harvey Hall 214

Katherine Hill is the author of two novels: The Violet Hour (Scribner 2013) and A Short Move (Ig Publishing 2020). With Sarah Chihaya, Merve Emre, and Jill Richards, she is also co-author of The Ferrante Letters: An Experiment in Collective Criticism (Columbia University Press 2020).

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Harvey Hall 213

Jan-Henry Gray is the author of Documents, chosen by D.A. Powell as the winner of BOA Editions’ A. Poulin, Jr. Poetry Prize and finalist for the 2019 Thom Gunn Award. His chapbook, Selected Emails, was published by speCt! Books in 2019. His poems, essays, and reviews have been published in various publications such as Nepantla: An Anthology for Queer Poets of Color (Nightboat Books, 2018), The Rumpus, DIAGRAM, Hyphen, The Margins, Poetry Foundation, NewCity, and Teachers & Writers Magazine. Jan has received fellowships from Kundiman and Undocupoets and awards from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation and the Academy of American Poets.

Born in the Philippines and raised in California, Jan has lived undocumented in the U.S. for more than 32 years. Recently, he co-organized Writers for Migrant Justice, a nationwide reading and fundraiser for Immigrant Families Together. He also serves as a mentor for the Asian Prisoner Support Committee, a teaching artist for City Lore (NYC), and a co-curator for Meanwhile (Chicago).

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